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Abbreviations


Royal Navy - Royal Naval Missiles - Trident D5, Tomahawk, Harpoon, Sea Viper (PAAMS), Sea Dart, Sea Wolf, Sea Skua, Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon, Other Missile - n6a1 - Armed Forces

ROYAL NAVAL MISSILES


TRIDENT D-5
SLCM: HUGHES TOMAHAWK IIIC/BLOCK IV
HARPOON
SEA VIPER PAAMS (ASTER)
SEA DART
SEA WOLF
SEA SKUA
FUTURE ANTI-SURFACE GUIDED WEAPON
OTHER MISSILES


TRIDENT D-5

Trident II (D-5) underwater launch

The UK Strategic deterrent (US Trident D-5) is deployed in the four Vanguard class Ballistic Missile Nuclear-Powered Submarines (SSBNs). The Trident D-5 missile is a three-stage, solid propellant Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) - it is 13.42 m long and has a body diameter of 2.11 m. It has a launch weight of 59,090 kg and a maximum range of 12,000 km. The minimum range is believed to be about 2,500 km and the current cost of each D-5 missile is believed to be in the region of 8.8 billion.

IIt has been stated that although the UK missiles are capable of carrying up to 12 warheads, they are currently carrying three warheads each making a total of 48 warheads each per Vanguard Class submarine. Each D-5 missile has a multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV) capability which allows the D-5 missile to engage multiple targets simultaneously.

There appear to be some UK plans to use some Trident D-5 missiles in a `sub-strategic' role, with a single warhead set to produce a smaller yield, believed to be around 10 kT.

The UK Government expects the Trident D5 missile to remain in service until about 2040 with a main gate decision on the replacement missile due in 2016. The estimated cost of the replacement missile system is between 2 billion and 3 billion (at 2006 prices).

The Defence Equipment Plan for 2012 suggests an expenditure of 12.7 billion over the next 10 years to maintain the Trident strategic weapons system.

Photo US Navy


SLCM: HUGHES TOMAHAWK IIIC/BLOCK IV

Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile during a flight test

US-built Tomahawk is deployed in all RN Attack submarines.

In 1995, the first export order for Tomahawk missiles was announced, with the UK ordering 65 missiles, Advanced Tomahawk Weapon Control Systems for seven boats, and a shore-based mission planning system.

The missiles were UGM-109C TLAM-C versions to the Block 3/4 build standard, to be launched from standard torpedo tubes in attack submarines.

The UK fired 20 missiles against targets in Serbia in early 1999, with more missiles fired against Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003 and Libya (at least 12) in 2011.

In February 2006 it was disclosed that Tomahawk missiles had been purchased as follows:
1997 48
1998 17
1999 0
2000 0
2001 20
2002 0
2003 22
2006 64 x Block IV.

The Block IV missiles have a range of up to 1200 kms (780) miles, can be retargeted in flight and can loiter above a target for more than two hours. Average cost of a Block IV Missile is believed to be in the region of 800,000.


Photo US Navy



HARPOON

RGM-84 surface-to-surface Harpoon missile leaving the capsule as it clears the surface of the water

Harpoon, manufactured by McDonnell-Douglas of the USA, is an extremely powerful anti-shipping missile that is fitted to the Type 23 Frigates and Type 45 Destroyers. The Sub Harpoon (UGM-84A) is also deployed in Astute and Trafalgar Class submarines.

The latest versions of this missile have extremely sophisticated electronic counter measures (ECM), and the ability to fly a sea-skimming course on a dog-leg path through three pre-programmed way points. The warhead is extremely powerful and a hit from Harpoon is almost certain to result in the destruction or disablement of a major surface vessel. In the longer term, we would expect Harpoon to be replaced by the Thales Lightweight Multi-Role Missile (LMM).

Harpoon Specifications

Length

3.84m

Diameter

0.343m

Total Weight

526kg

Warhead Weight

225kg

Range

110kms


Photo US Navy

SEA VIPER (PAAMS ASTER)

The Sea Viper (PAAMS - Principal Anti Air Missile System) is the surface to air missile system that is found on the Type 45 Destroyers. Two versions will be in service, the Aster 15 (short range) and the Aster 30 (long range).


Sea Viper is the only available system that can integrate three operational naval missions: self-defence, local area defence of nearby vessels and fleet area defence. The complete system consists of the missiles, missile launchers, command and control (C2) system and the associated radars.


Within the figure of 561.6 million overall cost for a Type 45 Destroyer, the cost of the Sea Viper system is approximately one third or about 187 million.


Sea Viper is also being purchased by France and Italy.




Sea Viper (PAAMS Aster) Specifications

Aster 15

Length

4.2m

Diameter

0.18m

Weight

310kg

Range

30kms (in excess of)

Speed

Mach 3

Aster 30

Length

4.9m

Diameter

0.18m

Weight

450kg

Range

100kms (in excess of)

Speed

Mach 4.5


Photo Copyright MBDA


SEA DART

Sea Dart is a surface-to-air missile system with a long range (probably in excess of 80kms) and employs a two-stage system with a primary booster rocket powering the warhead and ramjet on their way to the target.


There is a limited surface-to-surface capability out to a range of about 28km and the guidance system is a semi-active homing radar.


Sea Dart Specifications

Length

4.40m

Diameter

0.42m

Total Weight

549kg

Range

80km + approx




SEA WOLF

Sea Wolf Block 2 firing

Sea Wolf is a ship-based, surface-to-air missile designed for the defence of point targets.


This is a highly efficient system thought to be capable of dealing with aircraft, missiles and even artillery rounds.

The missile is fired from a vertical silo on Type 23 frigates, and guided on to its target by means of a a close in target engagement radar on the vessel under attack.

The guidance system is semi-automatic command to line of sight with radar and/or infra-red missile and target tracking.

The range of the original Sea Wolf was limited to about 10 kms but recent missile and radar upgrades are believed to have doubled the range of the system.

Current plans suggest that the Sea Wolf system will reach its out of service date in 2020.

Sea Wolf Specifications

Length

1.91m

Diameter

0.18m

Total Weight

79.8kg

Range

6/7000m

Altitude

3/4,000m


Photo Copyright MBDA



SEA SKUA

Sea Skua is a short-range, anti-ship missile that has been in Royal Naval service since 1982.

The missile is currently carried as the main armament of the Lynx aircraft flying from RN destroyers / frigates.


The guidance system is semi-active terminal homing.



Sea Skua is currently planned to leave service from around the latter part of the decade when it is intended to be replaced by the Future Anti Surface Guided Weapon (Light) that could be carried by Wildcat helicopters.

Sea Skua Specifications

Length

2.85m

Diameter

0.22m

Total Weight

147kg

Range

20kms approx


Photo Copyright MBDA



FUTURE ANTI-SURFACE GUIDED WEAPON

Thales's Lightweight Multi-role Missile (LMM) possible Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon

The Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon (FASGW) is intended to meet the requirement for the Royal Navy to maintains its Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) attack capability well into the middle part of the next century.

FASGW will provide the most cost-effective ASuW delivery system to meet the perceived threat of missile firing Fast Attack Craft (FAC) and to help establish sea control/sea denial within the area of operations (including the littoral) and on relatively undefended coastal targets.

The MoD has a requirement for two types of missile, alight version and a heavy version:

Photo Copyright Thales


OTHER MISSILES

FUTURE ANTI-SURFACE GUIDED WEAPON (LIGHT) - (FASGW(L))

This requirement is to be met with a Thales Lightweight Multi-Role Missile System (LMM), a derivative of the Starstreak missile. LMM will be used to attack smaller surface targets at sea and unprotected targets on land.

In 2011 Thales received a production contract for 1,000 LMM that provided for final testing and qualification and integration of the LMM on helicopter platforms. The LMM includes beam riding or semi-active laser guidance where the missile homes in on reflected energy with differing warhead options.

The LMM is believed to have a weight of under 14 kg and a range of up to 9,000 m (about 5.5 miles). The main LMM investment decision is expected in 2014 after which series production could start. We would expect the Wildcat maritime attack helicopter would initially be armed with LMM, and in the longer term the Type 26 Global Combat Ship.

FUTURE ANTI-SURFACE GUIDED WEAPON (HEAVY) - (FASGW(H))

MBDA is leading the Assessment Phase for the FASGW(H)) requirement and it is likely that the design will include a system that incorporates a new 100 kg modular, infrared-guided weapon system derived from the Sea Skua. FASGW (H) is expected to be available from around 2013.

There is a chance that FASGW(H)) could be part of a cooperative development signed by the governments of France and the UK, both governments having a similar requirement. The French are believed to requirement for an FASGW(H)) type system for their Panther and NH90 helicopters.

The MoD has spent about 1.7 million (end of 2012) on the FASGW(H)) assessment and the in-service date has yet to be finalised. Our estimate is that an in-service date of 2016-2017 would not be unrealistic.

FUTURE LOCAL AREA AIR DEFENCE SYSTEM (FLAADS(M)) SEA CEPTOR

The MoD has confirmed that a new Royal Navy missile air defence system named Sea Ceptor that will be able to intercept and destroy enemy missiles travelling at supersonic speeds is planned to be in service by late 2016. A 483 million contract to develop the system was announced in early 2012.

It is believed that the Sea Ceptor concept, that uses a new UK-developed missile capable of reaching speeds of up to Mach 3 and with a range of over 30 kms (19 miles), will have the ability to deal with multiple targets simultaneously, protecting an area of around 500 square miles over land or sea.

The Sea Ceptor air defence system has been designed for initial use on the Type 23 frigates to replace Sea Wolf air defence system when it is retired later later in the decade. In the longer term it is planned to be used on the Type 26 Global Combat Ship when it enters service early in the 2020s.

Sea Ceptor will be developed under a contract with MBDA (UK) that is expected to last for about five years. In the longer term Sea Ceptor could be adapted for both Army and RAF requirements.